Book cover: Paging God: Religion in the Halls of MedicineWendy Cadge is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at Brandeis University. She is an expert in contemporary American religion, especially related to religion in public institutions, religious diversity, religion and immigration, and religious and moral aspects of healthcare.

She is the author of two books, Paging God: Religion in the Halls of Medicine and Heartwood: The First Generation of Theravada Buddhism in America, and a co-editor of Religion on the Edge: De-Centering and Re-Centering the Sociology of Religion.

She founded and co-directed the Transforming Chaplaincy Project from 2015 to 2019, and in 2018 launched the Chaplaincy Innovation Lab. An award-winning teacher, she has published more than seventy-five articles and raised more than $6.5 million in support of her own research and teaching and that of colleagues.

On campus she is the Senior Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and the Social Science Division Head in the School of Arts & Sciences. She served as Chair of the Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Program from 2013-2018, a Faculty Representative to the Board of Trustees from 2014-2019, and co-chair of the Faculty Governance Task Force from 2017-2019.

Visit the following websites for some of her collaborative projects:

 

News

A Hidden Sacred Space? Read this Boston Globe article

Fire chaplains? A short piece here

Princeton Alumni Magazine, Tiger of the Week

Grants to support our Hidden Sacred Spaces Project from the NEH and the Chaplaincy Innovation Lab from Luce.

A short piece in The Conversation about chaplaincy across settings. Read it here

Part II of the WGVU piece about chaplaincy and spiritual care across settings. Listen in here.

Podcast about chaplaincy and spiritual care across settings. Listen in here.

Some background on Congressional chaplains. A short piece here.

Why do I love working with students? Some thoughts are here.

What do airport chaplains do? Listen to this podcast

Ever wonder about why airports have chapels? Read this post in The Conversation